A Blob of Memristor, Please!

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Computers are taking on fast. One day they may become very much like humans. So much so that jelly becomes their favorite food for thought.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The progress to make just that happen is on. North Carolina State University researchers have prepared a material with the physical properties of jelly, which is able to store memory, though not much at its current initial state. It’s made up of a liquid alloy consisting of gallium and indium metals, set into a water-based gel; works extremely well in wet environments, and are ideally suited for biocompatible electronic devices.

They term this sort a “memristor”, or a memory resistor, which may prove very helpful in memory research. It exists in one of two states at a given time: conductive or resistive, representing the 1s and 0s of binary code. The metal alloy functions as electrodes and stands on either sides of conducting gel in each of the circuits. When the incoming charge is positive, it forms an oxidized skin around itself and becomes a resistor. On treatment with the opposite charge, it sheds the skin and becomes a conductor.

So, next time, when you have had too much, and are thinking of having a memory chip implanted inside your brain, this information may come in handy. The rigid circuits of the past could not have helped you there..

 

 

 

– By Syeda Qudsia, NUST Center of Virology and Immunology.

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3 Comments to A Blob of Memristor, Please!

  1. Malik NCVI

    gud work! but if I see the real application of this device It seems awkward to compare it with a USB Devise of only 1 Inch but capable of storing more than 30 GB. 

    In fact it is a bad idea to use this material for storage of a data of enormous size because v already have many devices which can store in form of EM waves. Like it happens in CD/DVD or USB. You can understand the concept of disadvantage by comparing a film or recording cassette with a CD or DVD. In fact Iron oxide used in cassette occupy more space but gives long life to data and in case of CD, EM waves occupy a smaller space but have little life. BTW, nice stuff you collected.

  2. Malik NCVI

    gud work! but if I see the real application of this device It seems awkward to compare it with a USB Devise of only 1 Inch but capable of storing more than 30 GB. 

    In fact it is a bad idea to use this material for storage of a data of enormous size because v already have many devices which can store in form of EM waves. Like it happens in CD/DVD or USB. You can understand the concept of disadvantage by comparing a film or recording cassette with a CD or DVD. In fact Iron oxide used in cassette occupy more space but gives long life to data and in case of CD, EM waves occupy a smaller space but have little life. BTW, nice stuff you collected.

  3. Moazzam Abdullah

    @Malik NCVI
    I’m sure people would have said the same thing about hard disk drives 30 years ago but look where they are now. My point being that we can always find new solutions and improve on technology so nothing can be said about how practical a certain technology would be in the future. I find it interesting how technology seems to be getting closer and closer to the wierd SciFi gadgets we saw in movies.

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